Posts Tagged ‘health’

What about Ginger?

Image

Did you know…as one of the oldest spices known in Asia and Europe, ginger has a long history as a seasoning and was once as common as salt and pepper. People would add ginger to everything, including teas and beers leading to modern drinks like ginger ale and ginger beers.

Ginger is one of the world’s favorite spices and has been acclaimed for its medicinal benefits since ancient times. A perennial herb native to southern China, ginger was imported early on to India, Southeast Asia, West Africa, and Europe. Ginger is the underground rhizome of the ginger plant (Zingiber officinale).The flesh of the ginger rhizome can be yellow, white or red in color, depending upon the variety. Aromatic, pungent and spicy, ginger adds a special flavor and zest to stir fries and many fruit and vegetable dishes. Due to its various medicinal benefits, ginger is considered a herbal remedy in many cultures. Over the years, it has been used to reduce inflammation, help with digestion, improve cardiovascular health and even historically to even ward off diseases like the plague.

In the Ayurvedic tradition, ginger is highly regarded as having many diverse healing properties, and is used prominently in treating disorders of the digestive tract. In the Asian medicine tradition, ginger is considered to possess hot or warming attributes. It is also favored as a remedy for digestive conditions ranging from upset stomach to diarrhea to abdominal bloating.

Ginger is still widely used for its potent anti-inflammatory properties. The gingerols found in ginger are powerful anti-inflammatory compounds that inhibit the production of nitric oxide, which helps relieve joint pain that is associated with arthritis. It also provides substantial pain relief from gout, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, and also decreases swelling and helps with morning stiffness. In a research study published in 2005, investigators found that ginger may reduce inflammation more effectively than non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as aspirin.

Ginger is an excellent herb to use for strengthening and healing the respiratory system, as well as for fighting off colds and flu. It removes congestion, soothes sore throats, and relieves headaches and body aches. Ginger is loaded with antioxidants, which have immune-boosting properties. By strengthening the immune system, it protects you against all sorts of infections and diseases.

Although scientific research into the health benefits of ginger is really just beginning, over 2500 years of herbal wisdom, plus some recent scientific studies strongly support the use of ginger as an effective digestion aid. Ginger root has a great reputation for controlling nausea of all types. Several studies have found that ginger is more effective than placebo in relieving morning sickness. In a small study of 30 pregnant women with severe vomiting, those who ingested 1 gram of ginger every day for 4 days reported more relief from vomiting than those who received placebo. In a double-blind, comparative test at Brigham Young University, Utah, researchers found ginger root to be more effective in coping with motion sickness than the popular, over-the-counter drug, Dramamine.

Fresh ginger roots can be found in the produce section of most grocery stores. Ginger is also available in other forms including dried root, capsules, tablets, tea, extracts and tinctures. A simple ginger tea can be made by pouring hot water over one teaspoon of freshly grated ginger and allowing it to infuse for 10 minutes before straining. Lemon juice and a little honey can be added to it if desired.

Wellness Naturopathic Centre, North Vancouver, BC
www.wellnessnaturopathic.com

The information on this website is for educational purposes only. It does not substitute for proper assessment and treatment by a licensed health care provider.

Advertisements

The Most Important Meal of the Day

“Eat breakfast like a king lunch like a prince and dinner like a pauper”. There’s good reason for this saying. Many of my patients admit to skipping breakfast or even worse replace it with a cup of coffee instead so we always have a discussion around this topic. Breakfast allows your body to refuel for the day ahead; in essence you are “breaking your fast”. Some of the effects of skipping breakfast include fatigue, irritability, weight gain, low mood, and midmorning cravings for carbohydrates and sugar-your body has not been replenished with the fuels it needs to keep your blood sugar stable hence the cravings. Focus and concentration are also affected by skipping breakfast. This is especially seen in kids and students. Studies show that school children who eat breakfast are more alert, attentive and creative than those who don’t eat breakfast.

And for those who skip breakfast as an attempt to cut down on calories and help with their weight loss, not such a good idea. Eating breakfast actually kickstarts your metabolism for the day and skipping it makes losing weight more difficult.

If you are short on time to cook a big breakfast, simplify and plan ahead. Have a couple of boiled eggs, make a protein smoothie or prepare some oatmeal the night before, warm it up in the morning, sprinkle with some nuts and berries and that makes for a healthy quick breakfast. Having some form of protein in your breakfast is vital as this will ensure your blood sugar levels remain stable, you stay satiated for a longer period of time and you are less likely to be cave in to that midmorning cookie temptation!

Five Simple Steps to a Healthier Weight

Any change in life comes about by making small adjustments everyday and staying focused on your goal; losing weight is no different. Today is a new day. You can set your ideal weight goal and start making some simple changes to your daily routines which are guaranteed to give you results in the long run.

  • Cut out processed foods and empty carbohydrates. These include candies, pop, refined breads and pasta, processed cheeses, meats, canned foods, frozen dinners and so on.
  • Eat lots of fiber and vegetables to fill you up and reduce cravings.
  • Read the labels on the foods you buy. That “healthy” granola bar you snack on everyday may have more sugar and additives in it than you think. Stay away from foods that have added sugar which may be labeled as corn syrup or glucose-fructose. And just because a product is organic does not mean it has no added sugar, organic cane sugar is still sugar.
  • Be sure to include some healthy fats in your diet. These include nuts, seeds, fatty fish like salmon, avocados, and flaxseed oil. Healthy fats help stabilize blood sugar levels, reduce cravings and keep you satiated for longer periods of time.
  • Make it a habit to engage in at least one type of exercise daily. If you are not one to hit the gym every day then just do some other form of activity-run up and down the stairs 10 times or do 50 jumping jacks or go for a brisk 15 minute walk. The most important thing is setting a goal that’s realistic for you and sticking to it!

Wellness Naturopathic Centre, North Vancouver, BC
www.wellnessnaturopathic.com

The information on this website is for educational purposes only. It does not substitute for proper assessment and treatment by a licensed health care provider.

Know Your Dirty Dozen

Knowledge is power. Pesticides are substances commonly sprayed on fruits and vegetables for a better crop but this does not come without a price. Pesticides contain toxins that have adverse effects on health. Some pesticides are known to be carcinogenic (cancer-causing), others can disturb the hormone system and nervous system.Buying organic fruits and vegetables is ideal. But when it’s not possible to buy all organic, and you only have a certain budget for organics, knowing which ones are most contaminated can help you in your selection. The Environmental Working Group has provided a shopper’s guide 2011, pointing out the 12 most pesticide loaded produce, also known as the “dirty dozen” as well as the “clean fifteen” that is considered the least pesticide contaminated produce.

Here’s the dirty dozen list: apples, strawberries, peaches, domestic nectarines, imported grapes, domestic blueberries, celery, spinach, sweet bell peppers, potatoes, lettuce and kale/collard greens.
The clean fifteen list includes onions, sweet corn, pineapples, avocado, asparagus, sweet peas, mangoes, eggplant, domestic cantaloupe, kiwi, cabbage, watermelon, sweet potatoes, grapefruit, and mushrooms.
According to Environmental Working Group (EWG), having 5 daily servings from the dirty dozen list, would mean consuming 14 different pesticides per day. Having 5 daily servings from the clean fifteen would mean consuming less than 2 pesticides per day.

Take the list with you on your next grocery trip, and if organic is not affordable or available to you, aim for locally grown produce. Locally grown produce are more fresh and better on the environment because they don’t have to travel as much to get to your dinner table and they are more seasonal which is generally healthier and more in tune with your body. It also supports your local economy and community and of course tastes better!
Wellness Naturopathic Centre, North Vancouver, BC
www.wellnessnaturopathic.com

The information on this website is for educational purposes only. It does not substitute for proper assessment and treatment by a licensed health care provider.